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Full text of "This is Florida Presbyterian College at St. Petersburg, 1963-1964"

BULLETIN OF FLORIDA PRESBYTERIAN COLLEGE 



Vcl. IV, No. 9 September, 1962, Published Monthly. 

St. Petersburg. Florida. Second Class Postage paid at St. Petersburg, Florida 



ST. PKTEHS 




This is 



FLORIDA PRESBYTERIAN COLLEGE 



at St. Petersburg 



A Four-Year Coeducational Liberal Arts College 



Contents 



Aims ■^ 

Ways ^ 

Means 14 

Basic Curriculum 14 

Majors Offered 15 

Applied Science and Engineering 16 

Degrees, Requirements 16-17 

Curriculum 17 

Campus Life 18 

Admission 23 



Costs 25 

Staff 30 

Faculty 33 

Courses of Instruction 39 

Core Courses 41 

Humanities ' 41 

History and Social Sciences 49 

Mathematics and Natural Sciences 58 

Calendar of Events Inside Back Cover 



Freedom of Understanding 




pehdyMcMAIR 
MHWG AUDITORIUM 



This is a new age. No other group of college students 
has faced a future so bright with promise and opportunity 
and so challenging to man's intellectual and moral nature 
as the present generation. This catalogue, which presents 
the aims, ways, and means of Florida Presbyterian College, 
is designed to tell of a way of life in which college-aged 
youth may prepare themselves excellently for their 
dynamic futures. 

Students as scholars are concerned with truth: its 
understanding, presentation, augmentation, critical an- 
alysis, and transmission. Our age is witnessing not only 
an explosion of population but an explosion of knowledge. 
Florida Presbyterian College offers its students unlimited 
opportunity to confront truth through a library of care- 
fully selected volumes, fully equipped science and language 
laboratories, an exciting curriculum that emphasizes inter- 
disciplinary and independent studies, and, most important, 
an exceptionally well-qualified faculty. Florida Presby- 
terian College's way of life is a searching experience, 
leading the student from the limitations of a little know- 
ledge to the limitless freedom of understanding. 



Students, as Americans, are free people; and only 
among free people can the learning process go on. In such 
an atmosphere there is no sin in having a new idea and no 
safety in giving simply lip service to an old idea. Education 
is a refining process through which the mind and spirit 
are at one and the same time liberated and captured. The 
way of life of Florida Presbyterian College is an experience 
of growth leading the student from the confusions of 
youth to the commitments of maturity. 

Man is more than body and mind. "The heart, too, 
must be fed." A college student's understanding of truth 
must be complete. God cannot be "the forgotten factor" 
in man's search. He made man free. Our use of freedom in 
our search for truth must be related to an awareness of 
God and a concern for the good. The way of life of 
Florida Presbyterian College is a "becoming" experience, 
leading the student through questions and debates to bring 
adequate moral judgments to the issues of life. 

I invite young people, their parents, counselors, and 
our friends to consider sincerely the program illustrated 
herein and welcome any qualified student to life in our 
community. 

William H. Kadel 




To Open Horizons 

Liberal arts, so called because their study liberates men 
and fits them for a place in a free society, means opened 
horizons. The central concern of Florida Presbyterian 
College is to lead her students to deeper insight, compre- 
hension, and understanding of men, of our universe, and 
of the relations between the two. Through superior stu- 
dents, experimentation, and Christian community, Florida 
Presbyterian College plants in her students a desire for 
knowledge and a love of wisdom and invites them to the 
satisfactions which the persistent pursuit of such ideals 
may afford. 

Superior Students 

Florida Presbyterian College actively seeks superior 
students. Trusting that our leaders tomorrow are the 
superior students of today, Florida Presbyterian College 
trams them to be good leaders and to seek and to assume 
leadership. Certain kinds of curriculum and methods of 
teaching are possible and appropriate only with superior 
students. While Florida Presbyterian College has few rigid 
entrance requirements, it expects of her prospective stu- 
dents considerable attainment in academic subjects. In 
addition to scholarly achievement, students should display 
unusual breadth of interest and excellence of character 
conducive to the orderly transition from secondary school 
to college. Young men and women must be eager to learn 



to grow physically, intellectually, and spiritually. Above 
all, they must be ready to accept much of the responsibility 
for their own learning. 

Living Research 

Florida Presbyterian College exists to prove to the world 
that the minimum or average need not be the norm in 
education (or thinking) and to test the proposition that 
education can be both liberal and Christian. It adopts 
experimental attitudes in attempting to reach its goals 
through unique but carefully considered means. 

We are engaged in living research, in higher education, 
not merely in developing something we already have. The 
general direction of our research is to discover how students 
can most skillfully learn to make evaluations. Description 
and analysis are not sufficient, we believe, for moral edu- 
cation. They cannot be dispensed with: they are necessary 
in the search for truth. But the search for truth cannot 
stop with them. Truth requires judgment and choice 
based upon moral presuppositions. The formulations of 
standards of judgment as a conscious intellectual activity 
and the habitual judgment of such standards are an indis- 
pensable part of education. We do not presume that 
Florida Presbyterian College is the first college to assume 
the necessity of a moral end of education, but we are 
experimental in trying to find out how best such an end 
can be realized. 



A Christian Community 

In still a third way we are probably more experimental 
than in any other: we are trying to find out what a 
Christian college is! Those who have studied the idea long- 
est and hardest agree that people in general have no 
clear-cut idea of what a Christian college is or should be 
and that disagreement is to be expected. Still we are all 
united in believing that there should be a college in which 
the presuppositions are avowedly Christian. Truth, free- 
dom, and Christianity have inevitable connections whether 
in the search, the heritage, or the government of a Christian 
college. And we have a vision of a Christian community 
which is not monastic in separating dedicated persons from 
the world but which prepares dedicated people to go back 
into the world and witness through the exercise of their 
intellect. This witness, we pray, will prove to the world 
that a Christian education best fits people for life, liberty, 
and the pursuit of happiness for others. 

A private, coeducational, liberal-arts college, founded 
and maintained by the Presbyterian Churches, both U. S. 
and U. P. U. S. A. acting co-operatively, Florida Presby- 
terian College acknowledges as primary in the search for 
truth a knowledge of God and of ourselves as revealed in 
Jesus Christ. The College examines and nurtures beliefs 
and attitudes central to Christian interpretations of man 
and recognizes faith as a probing and vitalizing force. 
Dedicated to the inspiration of a strong sense of Christian 



obligation for involvement and leadership in local and 
global events, the College is equally dedicated to the 
proposition that its doors are open to qualified students 
of all faiths. 

Motivation 

Florida Presbyterian College thus has a deep concern 
for its students. It seeks to stimulate growth — the student's 
realization of individual potential — and encourages indi- 
vidual attainment. With the fundamental aim of the Col- 
lege community to make students aware of the seriousness 
of their vocation, students, throughout their undergraduate 
careers, exercise their powers of decision on the basis of 
informed and thoughtful judgment consciously pursued. 



Learning is Personal 



Florida Presbyterian College is a unified academic 
community in which each member's recognition and secur- 
ity depend on his freedom to pursue scholarship and to 
associate with others. Here learning is personal and widely 
varied because of the realization that knowledge comes 
from others of differing as well as similar backgrounds 
and pursuits. We employ both conventional and uncon- 
ventional methods in the search for truth to provide 
insights and skills which train and excite our students' 
intellects and emotions for creative and imaginative ex- 
pression. 

In guiding our students' development, we afford them 




innumerable opportunities to learn emotional independence, 
the necessity for individual questioning, and the right and 
duty of personal judgment. Thus, Florida Presbyterian 
College cherishes freedom of thought. For its entire aca- 
demic community — students, faculty, staff — the College 
insists upon respect for human dignity and individual 
moral responsibility supported by the belief that humanity 
was created for one great co-operation. Thus the College 
confronts students with the conflicts of cultures, affording 
them an opportunity to intensify their own search for 
meaningful and applicable values. Students learn to arrive 
at new and broader understandings of themselves and their 
studies in relation to culture, creation, and the ultimate. 

Prospective students, regardless of major field of study 
and plans beyond the undergraduate years, will find in 
Florida Presbyterian College educational experiences basic 
to lasting satisfaction, personal integration, and social use- 
fulness. The program of liberal arts, complete in itself, is 
eminently practical, regardless of a student's intended voca- 
tion or avocation. In addition, the college provides specific 
pre professional training for the ministry, medicine, law, 
education, business, and graduate work in specialized fields. 

In short, Florida Presbyterian College aims to provide 
life-long attitudes of always seeking deeper, fuller com- 
prehension, of always seeking the whole view, and of 
always following courses of action to extend capabilities 
and responsibilities for personal and corporate betterment. 



A Fresh Start 

Founded in the tradition of the great American Uberal- 
arts schools, Florida Presbyterian College has been sin- 
gularly blessed from its beginning. The founders, trustees, 
staff, and faculty have together pursued a policy of exper- 
imentation. This policy has been not to cast out what has 
proved successful in education of the highest quality but 
rather with a fresh start to develop and adopt new ap- 
proaches, programs, facilities, and procedures. Already the 
curriculum and the permanent campus, planned by archi- 
tects and educators, have captured widespread attention 
and enthusiasm among those concerned with meetmg the 
vastly increasing demands for higher education in the 
United States for superior students. 

To carry out a college program of the first order 
efficiently and at a minimum cost, students themselves 
undertake independent learning during their four years. 
The program generates independence of thinking and 
study to produce fuller understanding, to inspire personal 
initiative, and to develop welcome acceptance of responsi- 
bility. The entire program emphasizes independent study, 
under faculty guidance and review, and develops and 
maintains individual responsibility through specific means. 

Core Courses 

To promote a community of learners and to demon- 
strate the interrelatedness of knowledge, Florida Presby- 
terian College asks every student to take at least one course 



which all students in his year are taking. These are the 
core courses taught co-operati\^ly by professors from 
art, biology, economics, history, literature, language, 
mathematics, music, philosophy, physics, political science, 
psychology, religion, and sociology. In these, students 
pursue with the group and on their own a critical under- 
standing of the major attempts of man to interpret his 
purpose and to organize his experience through the 
analytic and historical study of works and institutions. 

Studies Abroad 

To increase in our students opportunities for self- 
directed study and a sense of world community, Florida 
Presbyterian College arranges studies abroad during the 
Winter Term, the summer, and the junior year. Students 
travel in groups and singly with projects for study planned 
in advance. The College co-operates with other schools here 
and abroad, tests the language proficiency of students for 
the project undertaken, and evaluates their accomplish- 
ments upon their return to the campus. 

Senior Seminar 

During his senior year, every student takes a seminar 
in his major field. Upon recommendation of their major 
professor, seniors may elect to pursue an independent pro- 
gram of study and research in addition to or in lieu of 
the senior seminar. They present the results of their work 
in a thesis. 



Winter Term 

The Winter Term is a special four-week period of 
independent study for all undergraduates. It comes be- 
tween the fall semester, which begins early in September, 
and the spring semester, which begins early in February. 
With examinations for the fall semester over before the 
Christmas holidays, January is free for intensive study. 
Designed to develop the qualities of self-discipline in pur- 
suits requiring the student to be the prime explorer, the 
Winter Term asks him to work without the customary 
routine of classroom and lecture hall on a single problem 
growing out of his other studies and to present his findings 
in final form. With guidance he chooses and limits his 
subject, gathers material, organizes it, and presents it as 
a paper, a short story, a painting, a piece of laboratory 
apparatus. During this special semester, each professor 
directs the activities of about fifteen students. A student 
selects a professor to work under; sometimes the group 
works co-operatively on topics or problems announced in 
advance, and sometimes they work separately. Throughout 
the four weeks, the professor is available for consultation 
and guidance. This intensive, independent study supple- 
ments the extensive work of the courses and thus affords 
unusual opportunity for the student each of his four years 
to engage in extended, creative work not normally af- 
forded in traditional undergraduate curriculums. Through 
the Winter Term at Florida Presbyterian College, the 



student not only works on his own to master a limited 
subject but may have the benefit of step-by-step evalu- 
ation of his work. 

Independent Study 

Proficiency rather than fulfillment of course require- 
ments is the measure of accomplishment and admission to 
advanced studies. Thus performance (e.g., on placement 
tests) rather than credit previously earned admits students 
to advanced work in the core courses, languages, sciences, 
and mathematics and determines progress toward a degree. 
In many areas, students can work independently, preparing 
themselves for advanced standing, doing research, and 
writing papers, and receive recognition for their work 
without attending lectures and classes. Hence a student 
may accelerate his education during the school year and 
the summer months at home according to his capabilities 
and secure the full recognition for work done indepen- 
dently which course credit normally certifies. 

Size of Classes 

Florida Presbyterian College has few middle-sized 
classes. They are either large enough to encourage inde- 
pendent work and the exchange of ideas within the whole 
community or small enough to permit discussions in which 
learners (that is, both teacher and students) explore, de- 
bate, and form conclusions together. Both large and small 
groups place increasing responsibility on the student and 



give him two different kinds of experience in learning. 
The large course contributes to the idea of community by 
assembling all students of a given year for lectures, panels, 
demonstrations, movies, and concerts and by providing 
small groups where students test their personal reactions 
against those of their fellows in a free forum. 

The Language Laboratory 

A primary objective of studying a modern foreign 
language is learning to speak and understand it. The 
language laboratory facilitates this aspect of learning 
through aural-oral practice that the conventional class- 
room does not provide. The laboratory at Florida Pres- 
byterian College is of the newest design. It operates thirty- 
five positions by remote control so that the student can 
work independently or as a member of a class. By merely 
dialing an appropriate number, the student can hear an 
instructional tape, record his own responses, and play it 
back for comparison and corrections. As many as a hun- 
dred different tapes are available to the student at any 
time. 

The Reading Program 

Reading ability and effective study go hand in hand; 
usually a good student reads well. Hence Florida Presby- 
terian College offers a reading program for all students 
to improve their reading. This program is not only for 
students deficient in reading ability but also for good 



students. Often superior students can become even more 
efficient by increasing their reading rate; the best students 
often make phenomenal improvement. Our reading lab- 
oratory is well equipped, containing rate pacers, tachisto- 
scopes, a controlled reader, and a library of reading texts. 
This laboratory provides both group work and attention 
to individual needs. NS^''ith some suggestions and guidance 
from the instructor, the student works as independently 
as possible. We ask some freshmen on the basis of their 
tests to take work in reading necessary to enable them to 
master the heavy reading assignments of our program. At 
the beginning of the sophomore year we give students who 
have not completed a course in reading a proficiency test. 
On the basis of this and other tests they learn whether they 
should take a course in reading to raise their general pro- 
ficiency, whether they should work on special reading 
skills, or whether, though their reading is above average, 
they can profit by increasing their rate. Throughout their 
four years students can receive help in achieving efficient 
reading rates. 

The Writing Laboratory 

Since academic success depends in great measure upon 
the written word, Florida Presbyterian College emphasizes 
a high degree of proficiency in writing both in the selec- 
tion of its students and in determining their progress. The 
College looks for students who do not require training in 
writing in a formal course of composition. It makes heavy 



demands upon them in their writing. Students learn to 
expect criticism from all their professors on their written 
work and help in planning papers and achieving effective 
style. In addition some staff members are available to help 
students overcome individual weaknesses. The writing lab- 
oratory enables students to form efficient procedures by 
providing a workshop for writing with a faculty con- 
sultant and appropriate reference books. 

The William Luther Cobb Library 

Because the liberal-arts college must be a reading col- 
lege, the library is the center of the academic program. 
With our emphasis upon independent work, the library, 
gift of Mr. and Mrs. William Luther Cobb of Tarpon 
Sprmgs, Florida, is the primary instrument in the educa- 
tional process, the storehouse of the information, opinions, 
and techniques necessary to a liberal education. Through 
open shelves and collections maintained in each dormitory, 
students have easy access to many books. The library not 
only supplies materials for reference, required reading, 
and research papers but also compiles bibliographies, pre- 
pares exhibits, and promotes interest in reading. 

The initial goal of the William Luther Cobb Library 
is 100,000 volumes. 

The Science Laboratories 

A student in the natural sciences has opportunity to 
undertake laboratory practice and research. Manual exer- 



cises and routine experiments (which are not experiments 
at all but repetitions) are minimized. Emphasis is rather 
on the student's acquiring the ability to understand theory 
and experimentation, exploring the appropriateness of 
methods and evaluating design and techniques. The small 
laboratory becomes the place for group discussion and 
provides occasion for exchange of ideas and procedures 
among students. 

Natural and man-made laboratories combine to provide 
varied off-campus scientific study in the College's im- 
mediate area. The climate allows year-round field work 
m natural laboratories such as lakes, bays, and land-area 
communities, and students can apply their knowledge of 
chemistry, physics, and biology to aquatic environments 
under a continuing research program. There is also a high 
concentration of excellently staffed laboratories nearby 
concerned with electronics, nuclear physics, and chemistry 
in many private and governmental research facilities in 
the area. 

The Studios 

The practice of art and of music flourishes in the 
studios of Florida Presbyterian College. Here students may 
receive professional guidance individually or in groups of 
various sizes, or they may pursue independently the mas- 
tery of techniques. In the art studio a student works in 
many media. In the music studio he may study voice or 
the instrument of his choice. Small vocal and instrumental 



ensembles read their abundant literature throughout the 
year, and larger, more formal musical organizations re- 
hearse regularly and present concerts both on and off 
the campus. As a result of their studio work, students 
periodically offer exhibits of their paintings, prints, and 



sculptures and present recitals to the College community 
and friends. In its emphasis upon the activities of the 
studios, the College encourages its students' personal 
involvement with the materials of the creative and per- 
forming arts. 




The Willrain Luther Cobb Library is the center of the academic pn 



The Curriculum 



The Basic Four-Year Curriculnni 



FRESHMAN 



SENIOR 



Fall 


Core Course 


Language 


Mathematics or Logic 


Science 


Physical Education 


S^iNTER Independent Study and Research 


Spring 


Core Course 


Language 


Mat hematics or Logic 


Science 


Physical Education 




Fall 


Core Course 


Language 


Two Other Coiirses 


Physical Edjication 


Sf'iNTER Independent Study and Research 


Spring 


Core Course 


Language 


Two Other Courses 


Physical Education 




Fall 


Core Course 


Two Courses in Major 


Two 


Other Courses 


JOINTER Independent Study and Research 


Spring 


Core Course 


Two Cotirses hi Major 


Two 


Other Courses 




Fall 


Core Course 


Two Courses in Major 


Two 


Other Courses 


JC^iNTER Independent Study and Research 


Spring 


Core Course 


Two Courses in Major 


Two 


Other Courses 



This is the basic curriculum, the minimum program 
of the College. Students working with their advisers build 
on it, adding to it, adapting it to their abilities and needs. 
It gives them a choice of languages and sciences, a choice 
between mathematics (on several levels) and logic. In 
additon their proficiencies give them scope in 

a. Language. Students must demonstrate competence 
in speaking, reading, and writing a foreign language 
and be familiar with the culture of the country to 
which the language is native. Competence sometimes 
is achieved through two college years of study fol- 
lowing two years of high-school study in the same 
language. 

b. Mathematics and logic. Students take whatever 
mathematics they are ready for, or logic, in either 
the freshman or sophomore year. 

c Courses in the major. By postponing mathematics 
or logic to the sophomore year, students may begin 
work in their major field as freshmen. The several 
fields of major study stipulate various requirements 
(see Courses of Instruction, pp. 39-63). 

Majors 

Students may major in 
Humanities 
Art 

Languages (French, German, Greek, Latin, Russian, 
Spanish) 



Literature 

Music 

Philosophy 

Religion 
History and the Social Sciences 

Economics and Business Administration 

History 

Political Science 

Psychology 

Sociology and Anthropology 
Mathematics and the Natural Sciences 

Biology 

Chemistry 

Mathematics 

Physics 
(Courses in Education leading to a teaching certificate 
at the secondary level are offered in conjunction with 
majors.) 

The curriculum also provides specific preparation 
courses for graduate work in specialized fields, including 
law, medicine, and the ministry. 

d. Other courses. The College accepts and endorses the 
policy general in American education that a liberal- 
arts program includes studies in the three principal 
divisions. Yet it does not accept the standard pro- 
cedure of prescribing a certain number of courses 
in other than the major departments because it 



tends to an accumulation of courses not in any deep 
sense relevant to the intelligent development of the 
particular student or to his major course of study. 
Accordingly, it has established a policy of making 
the course of study unified for individual develop- 
ment and interests. The College does not specify 
attention to other fields as a given number of 
courses but rather as a plan involving a student's 
unique experiences of programmed special readings 
connected with his main interest, of independent 
study, or of other devices. The principle operative 
in each case is that the plan of study be coherent 
and orderly and not defined as formal course credits. 

Curriculum for 

Applied Science and Engineering 

Florida Presbyterian College offers a baccalaureate 
program in applied science and engineering. Members of 
the class of 1966 who entered college in September 1962 
are eligible to major in this program designed to provide 
a technical education in the context of the general College 
requirements. 

The engineering student studies the humanities and 
social sciences through the core curriculum and elective 
courses and obtains a high level of proficiency in a foreign 
language. Many of his courses are in mathematics and the 
basic sciences. Courses in the engineering fields will be 



modern in content with relatively little emphasis on those 
techniques now relegated to the technical aide or assistant. 
Through the Winter Term and the emphasis on indepen- 
dent study the student develops his creative abilities. 

The program offers two majors in the beginning phase, 
electronic engineering and mechanical engineering. The 
third and fourth years introduce technical studies, and 
the fifth year is devoted to them. The curriculum of each 
student will be designed to meet all accrediting require- 
ments and to meet the needs of each student. 

Degrees 

Florida Presbyterian College awards the degrees of 
Bachelor of Arts to students in the Humanities and the 
Social Sciences and Bachelor of Science to students in 
Mathematics and Natural Sciences. Students in the Cur- 
riculum of Applied Science and Engineering earn the 
degree of Bachelor of Science at the end of four years and 
then the degree of Bachelor of Engineering upon satisfac- 
tory completion of the fifth year. 

Requirements for Degrees 

Although there are no absolute requirements for the 
degrees the college looks for: 

a. The experience of the general, interdisciplinary core 
courses, 

b. a grasp of the fundamental methods and concepts 



Applied Science and Engineering Curriculum 



Fall Core Course 

FRESHMAN Winter 



Spring Core Course 



Language 



Mathematics 



Chemistry 



Independent Stmiy and Research 



Language 



Mathematics 



Chemistry 



Fall Core Course Langtuige Mathematics Physics Physical Education 

SOPHOMORE Winter 



Spring Core Course 



Independent Study and Research 



Language 



Mathematics 



Physics 



Physical Education 



Physical Education 



Physical Education 



Fall Core Course 

JUNIOR Winter 



Spring Core Course 



Electi 



Mathematics 



Science 



Independent Study and Research 



Electi 



Mathematics 



Technical Studies 



Science Technical Studies 



SENIOR 



FIFTH 
YEAR 



Fall Core Course 

Winter 



Spring ^°''' <^°«"«' 



Electi 



Senior Seminar 



Independent Study and Research 



Technical Studies 



Science Technical Studii 



Elective Senior Seminar Science Technical Studies 



in the humanities, social sciences, and physical 
sciences, 

c. proficiency in a language other than the student's 
native language, 

d. competence in a major field of study, 

e. participation and achievement in physical education, 

f. achievement in independent study, particularly in 
the Winter Term, 

g. ability to speak and write English effectively and 
correctly. 

Grades and Their Meaning 

The evaluation of academic progress at Florida Pres- 
byterian College rests on a student's response to educational 
opportunity rather than on the fulfillment of an arbitrary 
set of course requirements- Our standards emphasize qual- 
ity rather than quantity, and our rewards and awards are 
for outstanding and creative work. To emphasize the 
greater importance of intellectual achievement than of 
grades, Florida Presbyterian College uses grades only for 
advisory purposes and for the transfer of credit to other 
institutions. In advising students, we use the grades of 
H (honors), S (satisfactory, and U (unsatisfactory). 

After College 

Education at Florida Presbyterian College has been 
designed to be complete in itself as well as a starting point 



for a continuing search for truth. 

By its nature, it will prove an excellent training base 
for those who wish to pursue advanced academic training 
in a specialized field. We expect a substantial number of 
our graduates to go on to some advanced study — in edu- 
cation, medicine, law, the ministry, the sciences, the 
humanities, engineering, the social sciences, and other 
fields. 

To assist students in obtaining permanent positions 
after graduation, we shall have a placement office to 
arrange visits for companies and agencies seeking personal 
interviews with our students. In addition, the Placement 
Office will undertake special activities to assist those grad- 
uates who seek opportunities in teaching. 

A continuing program of alumni participation is to 
be established, and close contact with alumni is planned 
through various publications, personal visits, seminars, class 
reunions, a continuing study program, and other means. 
This College will endeavor to continue, as it did during 
the undergraduate years, to serve as a great stimulus to 
the men and women who came to it seeking an education 
of high quality and who have left as mature, responsible 
people capable of leadership. 

Campus Life 

Florida Presbyterian College provides a residential stu- 
dent life, most of its undergraduates living on campus. The 
young men and women in residence learn from their 



friends and associates, acquire understanding, leadership, 
and tolerance, and practice free, democratic choice of 
action. Our nonresident students participate in all campus 
functions in every way possible. All students become in- 
volved in and identified with the academic community as 
a whole. 

Honor System 

Student government is an important part of campus 
life at the College. Collective action by undergraduates in 
self-government is vital to the College program. Basic 
thereto is the Honor Sysfeiii, enforced by the students 
themselves. All student activity, academic and social, pre- 
supposes it. Predicated on Christian values, in its practice 
it contributes to the development of emerging, mature 
human beings. The College encourages a full, satisfying, 
and meaningful campus life involving all students, and 
they organize and conduct social functions, publications, 
intramural sports, organizations, and special events like 
concerts. 

Counseling 

Each student meets a faculty adviser during the sum- 
mer Pre-college Conference. The day before the opening 
of Fall Semester, the adviser prepares his students for the 
College program. He schedules periodic conferences during 
the year with each student and is available for additional 



meetings upon request. Faculty advisers form an integral 
part of the counseling program, and through his adviser 
every student has access to every special program and 
assistance likely to make college life meaningful and enjoy- 
able. 

The College compiles much information concerning 
students during the course of admission: strengths, weak- 
nesses, interests, aptitudes, and the like. The Director of 
Counseling uses such information in choosing the most 
appropriate adviser for each student. He gives both the 
adviser and the resident counselor relevant information. 
Thus rather than being merely one of the herd, each stu- 
dent is a distinct person with his individual problems and 
potentialities. 

Through the resident counselor, faculty adviser, or any 
faculty or staff member or through his own efforts, a 
student may seek and learn ways to get additional assistance 
for making the most of his college experience. A profes- 
sional counseling service is available on a confidential 
basis to students with personal problems. And a vocational- 
guidance program assists students in academic and voca- 
tional planning. 

Religious Life 

The religious program of Florida Presbyterian College 
is ecumenical, organized as the Student Christian Associ- 
ation (SCA). Its mission is to focus the Christian faith in 
the academic community. To this end, the SCA constantly 



strives toward the following: 

a persistent, prayerful search for the meaning of the 

Christian faith; 
a conscious effort to discern God's purpose for each 

person especially as it relates to his vocation; 
a fellowship of the academic community joined in a 

common worship and the search for truth; 
a continuous appraisal of the community to help keep 
the Christian faith central in our search for truth; 
a conscious concern for the life and mission of the 
Ecumenical Church and encouragement of respon- 
sible participation in its members. 
The basis for the program is worship. Being within the 
Protestant tradition, all aspects of our program are volun- 
tary. The chaplain and choir conduct a worship service 
for the community on Thursdays. The worship committee 
of the SCA conducts evening prayers three times a week. 
Through designing and conducting worship, students have 
the opportunity of understanding better the meaning of 
worship. After Evening Prayer on Sunday, the SCA con- 
ducts its general program of the week. During the week, 
the SCA sponsors small study groups. Faculty members 
conduct general discussions in the dormitories. The SCA 
program deals with the teachings of the Church and en- 
compasses campus, community, national, and international 
problems. Students also have an opportunity to take part 
m regional and national conferences and ecumenical work 
camps. The program of Florida Presbyterian College helps 



the student to an intelligent and responsible Christianity 
in all areas of life. 

Medical Services 

Students have medical attention and services through- 
out the academic year. A registered nurse is on hand and 
a physician available at all times on a consulting basis. 
Those cases that cannot be treated in the college's own 
well-equipped infirmary will be referred to either of tTKo 
excellent hospitals in the City of St. Petersburg. One of 
these hospitals is only eight blocks from the interim 
campus. All students are required to have adequate health 
and accident insurance. 

Sports for All 

In addition to the required physical education for 
freshmen and sophomores, an integral part of the cur- 
riculum, the College conducts an intensive program in 
intramural sports of all kinds for both men and women, 
with emphasis on such water sports as swimming, boatinsj, 
sailing, water skiing, and skin diving. There is also an 
intercollegiate sports program at FPC. 

Concerts 

Students in the Chapel Choir, the Concert Choir, the 
Choral Union, and the Sandpipers make their own music 
and give frequent concerts around the state of Florid ^. 
Periodically, College instrumentalists and singers and vi^ - 

I 



ing artists give recitals of chamber music and solos on 
campus. 

The College sponsors an annual series of concerts. The 
1962-63 program includes Eileen Farrell, the North 
Carolina String Quartet, Andres Segovia, the National 
Players in Othello, and Eugene List. 

In the city, two symphony orchestras, an opera group, 
a woodwind quintet, two concert series, and a string quar- 
tet offer numerous programs. 

Lectures 

The core curriculum, the College societies, forums, and 
clubs, and the divisions of the College bring guest speakers 
throughout the year. 

Films 

About once a month the College runs a movie chosen 
for any reason that makes it excellent: its plot, its pho- 
tography, its direction, its acting, its technical innovations, 
its humor, its topical interest. Films in this series are sup- 
plemented by pictures shown by College departments, 
divisions, or the core program. The St. Petersburg Chapter 
of the National Council of Jewish Women provides the 
College a series of foreign movies. 

Dramatics Activities 

Dramatics is for the many, not the few, at Florida 
Presbyterian College. Although there are major produc- 



tions each semester for experienced actors and the inter- 
ested and ambitious, many students who can spare only 
a limited amount of time have the opportunity to take 
part in dramatic readings every two or three weeks. Dra- 
matic productions also play a part in course work, for at 
least once a semester students present a play during the 
regular lecture hour for the core program. 

Societies 

The Social Science Forum, open to students majoring 
or especially interested in Economics, History, Political 
Science, Psychology, and Sociology or Anthropology, seeks 
to stimulate student interest in graduate work and pro- 
fessional opportunities, in part through discussions of 
controversial and interdisciplinary materials. 

Foreign Language clubs promote interest, understanding 
and appreciation of the language, literature, and culture 
of the countries involved. 

The Chemistry Club affords an opportunity for stu- 
dents of chemistry to become better acquainted, to secure 
experience in preparing and presenting technical material 
before chemical audiences, to foster a professional spirit 
among the members, and to instill a professional pride in 
chemistry. 

Publications 

The Trident is the student newspaper published twice 
a month. Incite is a literary magazine appearing once or 



twice a semester. Students also publish the annual FPC 
Handbook, the publication designed for new students at 
the college. 

Admission 

In admitting students, this college considers past aca- 
demic performance (particularly in mathematics, science, 
literature, and language), achievement on examinations, 
and such personal qualifications as character, range of 
interest, poise, maturity, and personal development. It 
emphasizes the student's ability to profit from and con- 
tribute to the learning community. Anyone deemed unde- 
sirable because of his conduct and character may be 
refused admission or, as a student, may be requested to 
withdraw from the college at any time. 

Procedure 

This is the admissions procedure: 

a. Applicants must arrange to take College Entrance 
Examination Board tests. 

b. Early in his senior year in high school, a candidate 
should write to the Director of Admissions, Florida Pres- 
byterian College, for an application form and a transcript 
form. A formal application for admission, along with an 
application fee of $10, should be completed and returned 
to the Admissions Director. (The fee is not refundable.) 
The applicant should request the principal of the high 
school from which he is to be graduated to send a tran- 



script of his record to the Admissions Director of Florida 
Presbyterian College. 

c. The candidate should ask the College Entrance 
Examination Board to send his scores on the Scholastic 
Aptitude (Morning) Test and the writing sample to the 
Director of Admissions of the College. 

Florida Presbyterian College requires all candidates for 
admission to take the Scholastic Aptitude (Morning) Test 
of the College Entrance Examination Board and the writ- 
ing sample. It also highly recommends, but does not 
require, that applicants take the following Achievement 
Tests: Intermediate Mathematics, and one other, selected 
from twelve choices, at no additional cost. Testing centers 
throughout the country give these at specified times. At 
least six weeks before the date of the test, the candidate 
should apply directly to College Entrance Examination 
Board, Box 592, Princeton, New Jersey. The Board sends 
an information booklet giving full details about testing 
centers and the tests available and will mail the test results 
directly to the colleges designated by the applicant. 

Scholastic Aptitude Registration 

Test Given Registration Until with Penalty 

December 1, 1962 November 3 November 17 

January 12, 1963 December 1 5 December 29 

March 2, 1963 February 2 February 16 

May 18, 1963 April 20 May 4 

August 14, 1963 July 17 July 31 

Advanced Placement Program courses will be honored 
at Florida Presbyterian College on the basis of scores on 



the Advanced Placement Examinations administered by 
the College Entrance Examination Board. Scores of three, 
four, and five will automatically certify the student in 
the course covered by the examination. 

The applicant for admission to the Freshman class 
must have completed the graduation requirements and 
demonstrated academic competence in a high school or 
preparatory school accredited by a state or regional accred- 
iting agency. Even though the academic record will not be 
judged primarily on specific units of work, certain courses 
are strongly recommended: four years of English, two and 
one-half years of mathematics, two years of language, one 
year of history, and one year (preferably two) of science. 
The Admissions Office will compile complete infor- 
mation on each applicant for admission, including the 
original request for admission information, transcripts from 
the applicant's high school or preparatory school, test 
scores, personal recommendations, and any other pertinent 
data. This file forms the basis for first selection of candi- 
dates by the Admissions Committee each year. 

Students should apply for admission early in their 
senior year, preferably in September, submitting a tran- 
script of their high school or preparatory school record up 
to then and taking the College Entrance Examination in 
the December before graduation. Tests taken in January 
or March are acceptable but not recommended. The Pre- 
liminary Scholastic Aptitude Test taken during the junior 
year is helpful. 



Some students academically too advanced for further 
high school, or over twenty-one years of age, may have 
the entrance requirements waived. The Admissions Com- 
mittee considers such cases individually. 

A student at another college or university wishing to 
transfer to Florida Presbyterian College should complete 
the requirements for admission already listed and submit 
a transcript of his college record with a catalogue and a 
statement from the college of his academic standing and 
personal qualifications. Full transfer from other institu- 
tions approved by the Regional Accrediting Agency in 
full depends upon the correspondence of the courses to 
those offered at Florida Presbyterian College and the 
approval of the academic division concerned. Grades below 
C are not acceptable for transfer. 

All candidates will be required to deposit $50 with the 
Admissions Director of the College upon notification of 
acceptance. This money, though not refundable, is applied 
to the student's tuition upon enrollment. 

Upon acceptance for admission, the applicant will 
receive a form for a medical examination to be completed 
by a physician within the three months preceding matricu- 
lation, and to reach the director of Admissions by 
August 20. 

Each freshman attends an interesting, informative, 
and productive three-day orientation conference held dur- 
ing the summer prior to enrollment and has a choice of 
sessions, spaced throughout the summer, to make attend- 



ance convenient. With a limit of thirty-five students, each 
conference affords ample opportunity for meeting the 
college staff and other students. Such activities as pre- 
registration, book purchase, room assignment, course 
counseling, and general college orientation, not to speak 
of vocational guidance tests and placement tests, prepare 
both students and staff for the year's work. The expense 
of this conference is included in the general fee. Parents 
may attend all or part of this program. 

Costs 

A college education of high intellectual challenge is of 
lasting value and like most things of value is costly. Only 
ignorance is more so. Private, non-tax-supported institu- 
tions like Florida Presbyterian College make every effort 
to keep the cost of education down. As a result the student 
pays only a portion of the actual bill for his own education. 

The total cost of an academic year is approximately 
$1775. This includes room, board, fees, and tuition but 
not clothes, laundry, books, travel, recreation, bedding, 
towels, soap, health insurance, or special instructional fees. 
Nonresidents pay $950 for tuition and fees. Private in- 
struction in music is approximately $150 a year for one 
hour a week and $90 a year for one-half hour. 

Financing Your Education 

Generally, half of the total cost, minus a $50 acceptance 



fee and any room deposits, is due at entrance in September 
and the rest January 1 5. Matriculation is a contract binding 
the student (and his parents) for tuition, fees, room, and 
board for the entire semester. The college has many dif- 
ferent ways to finance your education. The Director of 
Admissions will send a list of scholarships and loans upon 
request. The College co-operates with insurance and tu- 
ition-plan companies to make available to parents various 
programs for financing educational expenses. 



On-Campus Employment 

Many part-time jobs are available: in dining rooms, 
offices, laboratories, library, bookstore, swimming pool. 
They pay about $2 50 a year for a ten-hour week. Though 
off-campus part-time work is also available, the day of 
full time earning while learning in college is about over. 



Loans 

All students ought to consider borrowing money for 
a college education. Student loans are good business: a 
college education considerably increases earning power, 
many loans require little or no deferred interest, and some 
need not be repaid in full. The college has endowed loan 
funds and participates in the National Defense Education 
Loan Program. 



j^'iPPR^ 



■ n'l rr 




The Staff 



Board of Trustees 



J. Colin English, Sr., Chairman of the Board 
Clem E. Bininger, Vice-Chairman 
William W. Upham, Treasurer 



Garnette J. Stollings, Assistant Treasurer 

J. Leo Chapman, Secretary 

D. P. McGeachy, Jr., Assistant Secretary 



Mr. Walter D. Bach 

Secy.-Treas., Sherrill Oil Company 

Pensacola. Florida 
Mr. J. Lee Ballard 

Pres., First Gulf Boh. Bank & Trust Co. 

St. Petersburg Beach, Florida 
The Reverend Clem E. Bininger, D.D. 

Pastor, First Presbyterian Church 

Fort Lauderdale, Florida 
The Reverend Andrew W. Blackwood, Jr. 

Pastor, First Presbyterian Church 

West Palm Beach, Florida 
Mr. Cecil V. Butler 

Pres., Havana Tobacco Leaf Corp. 

Havana, Florida 
Mr. J. Leo Chapman 

Attorney-at-Law 

West Palm Beach, Florida 

Mr. Rav Clements 

Ta.x Collector, Polk County 
Bartow, Florida 

Mr. W. L. Cobb 

Pres., W. L. Cobb Construction Co. 
St. Petersburg, Florida 

Mr. Henry C. Coleman 

Chairman, Commercial Bank 
Daytona Beach, Florida 

Mr. Charles Creighton 

Pres., Creighton's Restaurants 
Fort Lauderdale, Florida 

Mr. Thomas E. David 

Attorney-at-Law 
Hollywood, Florida 



The Reverend John B. Dickson, D.D. 

Pastor, First Presbyterian Church 
Tampa, Florida 

Mrs. J. Morton Douglas 

Weirsdale, Florida 

The Reverend Paul M. Edris, D.D. 

Pastor, First Presbyterian Church 
Daytona Beach, Florida 

Mr. J. Colin English, Sr. 

Pres., First Securities Co. of Florida 
Tallahassee, Florida 

Mr. John L. Fahs 

Vice-Chairman, First National Bank 
Leesburg, Florida 

Mr. W. Wilson Garey 

Publisher, McGraw Hill Publishing Co. 
New York, New York 

Mr. Ben Hill Griffin, Jr. 

Pres., Ben Hill Griffin, Inc. 
Frostproof, Florida 
The Reverend Robert B. Hamilton, D.D. 

Winter Haven, Florida 

The Reverend Jack G. Hand, D.D. 

Pastor, First Presbyterian Church 
Jacksonville, Florida 

Dr. Donald J. Hart 

Dean, College of Business Adm. 
University of Florida 
Gainesville, Florida 
The Honorable Spessard L. Holland 
The United States Senate 
Washington, D. C. 



Mr. Frank M. Hubbard 

Pres., Hubbard Construction Company 

Orlando, Florida 
Mr. Robert M. King 

Pres., Rutland's Department Store 

St. Petersburg, Florida 
Mr. Oscar R. Kreutz 

Pres., First Federal Savings & Loan 
Association 

St. Petersburg, Florida 

Mr. Philip J. Lee 

Vice-President, Atlantic Coast Line 
Railroad Co. 

Jacksonville, Florida 
The Reverend D. P. McGeachy, Jr., D.D. 

Pastor, Peace Memorial Pres. Church 

Clearwater, Florida 
Mr. Alfred A. McKethan 

Pres., Hernando State Bank 

Brooksville, Florida 
Mr. Elwyn L. Middleton 

Attorney-at-Law, Burns, Middleton, 
Rogers & Garrell 

Palm Beach, Florida 
Mr. Arthur R. Miller 

Pompano Beach, Florida 
Mr. L. Allen Morris 

Pres., The Allen Morris Company 

Miami, Florida 
Mrs. M. J. Moss 

Orlando, Florida 
The Reverend Clyde L. Myers, D.D. 

Pastor, First Presbyterian Church 

Coral Gables, Florida 



Mr. Marion G. Nelson 

Pres., Commercial Bank 

Panama City, Florida 
The Reverend J. Calvin Rose, D.D. 

Pastor, Miami Shores Pres. Church 

Miami, Florida 
The Rev. Richard L. Scoggins, Th.M. 

Pastor, Wallace Memorial Pres. Church 

Panama City, Florida 
Mr. Robert T. Sheen 

Pres., Milton Roy Company 

St. Petersburg, Florida 
Mr. R. McDonald Smith 

General Contractor 

Jacksonville, Florida 
Mr. William C. Spitzer 

Assistant Vice-President 

Miami Beach First National Bank 

Miami Beach, Florida 
Mr. Garnette J. Stollings 

St. Petersburg, Florida 
Mr. John B. Turner 

Vice-Pres., Cities Service Oil Company 

Miami, Florida 
Mr. Herbert F. Underwood 

Pres., Underwood Jewelers, Inc. 

Jacksonville, Florida 
Mr. Frank D. Upchurch 

Attorney-at-Law 

St. Augustine, Florida 
Mr. William W. Upham 

The Upham Company 

St. Petersburg Beach, Florida 
General James A. Van Fleet (Ret.) 

Auburndale, Florida 
Mr. William H. West 

Realtor 

Fort Lauderdale, Florida 
Mr. John Joseph Williams, Jr. 

Attorney-at-Law 

Williams, Parker, Harrison, & Dietz 

Sarasota, Florida 
Mr. Ross E. Wilson 

Weirsdale, Florida 



Board of Counselors 

Cecil M. Webb, Chairman 
J. Stuart Dickson, Secretary 

Mr. Walter G. Allen, Jr. 

Tampa, Florida 
The Reverend Hugh F. Ash, D.D. 

DeLand, Florida 
The Reverend William M. Belk 

Orlando, Florida 
Mr. John Christo, Jr. 

Panama City, Florida 
The Reverend J. Stuart Dickson 

St. Petersburg, Florida 
Mr. William A. Emerson 

St. Petersburg, Florida 
Mr. Walter P. Fuller 

St. Petersburg, Florida 
Mr. Walter R. Gall 

Zephyrhills, Florida 
Mrs. C. G. (Sarah Belk) Gambrell 

New York City, New York 
Mr. J. S. Gracy 

St. Petersburg, Florida 
Mr. Benjamin E. Griffith, Jr. 

Orlando, Florida 
Mr. Robert R. Guthrie 

St. Petersburg, Florida 
Mr. Hal T. Harper 

St. Petersburg, Florida 
The Reverend Stephen T. Harvin, D.D. 

Jacksonville, Florida 
Mr. Bonnie M. Heath 

Oeala, Florida 
Mr. Carl A. Hiaasen 

Fort Lauderdale, Florida 
Mr. E. Colin Lindsey 

Tampa, Florida 
Mr. Raymer Magulre, Jr. 

Orlando, Fla. 
Mr. Sam H. Mann, Sr. 

St. Petersburg, Florida 
Mr. Walter T. Marable 

Jacksonville, Florida 
The Reverend Charles T. Martz, D.D. 

Lauderdale-by-the-Sea, Florida 

28 



Mr. Herbert S. Massey 

Dade City, Florida 
Thomas E. McKell, M.D. 

Tampa, Florida 
Mr. Ben L. McLaughlin 

Fairfield, Florida 
Mr. John R. McPherson 

Winter Garden, Florida 
Mr. James J. Parrish, Jr. 

Titusville, Florida 
Mr. Robert Paul 

Winter Haven, Florida 
Mr. John R. Phillips 

Lakeland, Florida 
Mr. E. Melvin Reynolds 

Daytona Beach, Florida 
Mr. Rolland A. Ritter 

Wyncote, Pennsylvania 
The Honorable B. K. Roberts 

Tallahassee, Florida 
Mr. Stanton D. Sanson 

Miami Beach, Florida 
Mr. E. W. Smith, Jr. 

St. Petersburg, Florida 
Mr. John A. Snively, Jr. 

Winter Haven, Florida 
Mr. John W. Sterchi 

Orlando, Florida 
Mr. W. H. Stuart 

Bartow, Florida 
The Reverend John W. Stump 

Sarasota, Florida 
Mr. James Thompson 

Fort Lauderdale, Florida 
Mr. James W. Walter 

Tampa, Florida 
Mr. Cecil M. Webb 

Tampa, Florida 
Mr. James M. Wellman 

Lakeland, Florida 
Mr. C. G. Whittaker 

Jacksonville, Florida 
Mrs. Charles J. Williams 

Jacksonville, Florida 
Mr. James Y. Wilson 

Lake City, Florida 
Miss B. Louise Woodford 

St. Petersburg, Florida 



Administration 

OFFICE OF THE PRESIDENT 

William Howard Kadel 
A.B., Gettysburg College 
S.T.B., Western Theological Seminary 
S.T.M., Western Theological Seminary 
Th.D., Union Theological Seminary (Richmond, Va.) 
D.D., Davidson College 

Emma H. Conboy, Administrative Secretary 

OFFICE OF THE DEAN OF THE COLLEGE 

John M. Bevan 

A.B., Franklin and Marshall College 
M.A., Duike University 
Ph.D., Duke University 
Dean of College 
Edna M. Blumenthal 

B.S., University of Cincinnati 
Head Residence Counselor 
Mary Jo Carpenter 

B.A., Agnes Scott College 
Admissions Counselor 
Louis C. Guenther 

B.A., Southwestern College 
M.A., University of Pittsburgh 
Ph.D., University of Pittsburgh 
Registrar 
William F. Harrison 

B.S., Emory University 
M.A., George Peabody College 
Librarian 



Lee K. Hildman 

B.S., Florida State University 
M.S., Florida State University 
Residence Counselor 

David K. Hostetler 

B.S., University of Tampa 
M.A., University of Virginia 
Assistant to Director of Counseling 

Margaret Ott 

B.A., University of Wisconsin 
M.A., State University of Iowa 
Residence Counselor 

DeWitt F. Roper 

A.B., Davidson College 
M.A., Florida State University 
Cataloguer 

William H. Taylor 

A.B., DePauw University 
Director of Admissions 

Mary Tillman 

B.A., Stetson University 
M.A., Emory University. 
Associate Librarian 
J. Thomas West 

B.S., Davidson College 
M.A., University of North Carolina 
Ph.D., Vanderbilt University 
Dean of Mm and Director of Counseling 



Frances W. Whitaker 

A.B., Winthrop College 
M.A., Columbia University, Teachers Colle 
Dean of Women 

DEVELOPMENT OFFICE 

Howard E. Anderson 
A.B., Park College 
Vice-President for Development 
Alton H. Glasure 

B.A., University of Georgia 
M.A., University of Georgia 
B.D., Columbia Theological Seminary 
L.L.D., Beaver College 
Director of Cimrch Relations 
John A. H. Hopkins, Jr. 

L.L.B., University of Denver 
Director of Deferred Giving 
John C. Spencer 

B.A., Alabama Polytechnic Institute 
M.A., University of Pennsylvania 
Director of Annual Giving 
Richard G. Toomey, Jr. 

A.B., University of South Carolina 
M.A., University of South Carolina 
Director of Public Relations 

BUSINESS AFFAIRS OFFICE 

R. Frank Garner, Jr. 

B.S., University of Georgia 
Vice-President for Business Affairs 



Robert S. Caleb 

Director of Atixiliaries and Services 
Robert B. Childers 

B.S., U.S. Naval Academy 
B.C.E., Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute 
M.C.E., Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute 
Superintendent of Buildings and Grounds 
Robert C. Edgar 

Acting Buildings and Grounds Engineer 
Everett A. Goodwin 

Director of Food Service 
Kenneth A. White, Jr. 

B.S., Florida State University 
Chief Accountant 

OFFICE OF THE CHAPLAIN 

Alan W. Carlsten 

B.S.E.E., University of Oklahoma 
B.D., McCormick Theological Seminary 
Chaplain 

MEDICAL STAFF 

Charles E. Aucremann 

A.B., Emory University 

M.S., Emory Universty 

M.D., Emory University 
David L. Jones 

B.S., University of Toledo, Toledo, Ohio 

M.S., Ohio State University 

M.D., Western Reserve University 
Margaret Ferguson, R.N. 
College Nurse 



GENERAL STAFF 



Dorothea Ashburn 

Chief Bookkeeper 

Nina Belle Boling 

Student Aid Bookkeeper 

Buelah Blackshear 

Maid 
Marian Bryson 

Executive Secretary, 
Development Office 
Janet Burger 

Secretary of Librarian 

Dorotha Cavanagh 

Machine Records Bookkeeper 

Joseph Chabot 

Custodian 
Hazel Clark 

Auxiliaries Services Clerk 
Dorothy Clarke 

Executive Secretary, 

Dean of College Office 
Ernest W. Corn 

College Associate, Development Office 
Adelaide E. Crowell 

College Library Associate 
Jean DeNoux 

Secretary to Superintendent of 
Buildings and Grounds 

Rosa Dorsey 

Maid 

Sada Folger 

Secretary to Chairman, 

History and Social Science Division 

Carl J. Froid 

Gardener 

James Geracia 

Groundskeeper 



Alice Harrison 

Secretary to Director of Church 
Relations 

Mary Lou Hawk 

Secretary to Director of Annual Giving 

Mae Heme 

Secretary to Chief Accountant 

Mary E. Howard 

College Associate, 

History and Social Science Division 

Gladys L. Humphrey 

College Associate, Humanities Division 

Clifford J. Hutchinson 

Assistant in Mathematics & 
Natural Sciences Division 

Clarence MacCausland 

Bus Driver 

Elizabeth Jernigan 

Cashier-Bookkeeper 

AVilliam H. Kemp 

College Associate, College Store 
John E. Kerr 

College Associate, Services Office 

John Landi 

Electrician and Maintenance Foreman 

Cynthia Lankford 

Secretary to Chairman, Mathematics 
and Natural Sciences Division 

Phyllis McMann 

Secretary to Registrar 

Pauline S. Melcher 

Acquisitions Assistant 
Mary S. Most 

Secretary to Chairman, 
Humanities Division 



Robert P. Neel 

Custodian 

James E. Nichols 

Custodian 

Ruth Pearsall 

Secretary for St. Petersburg 
Joint Campaign 

George W. Peters 

Security Guard 

Eleanor Pugh 

Secretary to Dean of Men 

Joseph Reinhold 

Custodian 

Doreen Simmons 

Receptionist and Switchboard Operator 

Clyde E. Spencer 

Carpenter- Painter 

T. Beverley Taber 

Executive Secretary, 
Business Affairs Office 

Lester C. Taylor 

Security 

Betty Tench 

Pledge Secretary, Development Office 
Fred Theobald 

College Associate, Custodian 
William J. Trask 

Bus Driver 

Arthur Trishka 

College Associate, Custodian 
Leonard G. Truitt 

Services Department 
Nelah Verdicchio 

Secretary to Director of Admissions 
Mildred Walker 

Secretary, President's Office 
Phyllis Zarek 

Receptionist and Clerk-Typist, Library 



Core of a College 

In no other area was so much painstaking care and 
concern evidenced at Florida Presbyterian College as in 
the selection of its faculty — the heartbeat of any such 
institution. Regardless of status or tenure, every faculty 
member finally selected combines scholarship and teaching 
to an extraordinary degree. 

The criteria for acceptance, as set forth by the Board 
of Trustees, call for a teacher with depth and command 
in his field of specialization and a breadth of cultural 



The Faculty 



William Howard Kadel 

A.B., Gettysburg College; S.T.B., S.T.M., Western 
Theological Seminary; Th.D., Union Theological 
Seminary, Virginia; D.D., Davidson College 
Presideitt 
John M. Bevan 

A.B., Franklin and Marshall; M.A., Ph.D., Duke 

Duke University 

Dean 

Division of Humanities 

Albert Howard Carter 

Ph.B., M.A., Ph.D., University of Chicago 
Chairman, Division of Humanities 
Professor of English and Humanities 



background enabling him to relate his own discipline to 
the totality of experience; who demonstrates personal and 
professional competence and growth through research, 
publication, and professional participation; who inspires 
students with his respect for his profession by his ability, 
his character, and his conduct; who has the ability himself 
to think creatively and objectively and to inspire his stu- 
dents to do likewise; who extends himself to his students' 
service, to his colleagues in co-operation, and to his com- 
munity in concern; and finally, whose Christianity the 
students will want to emulate. 



James O. Black 

B.A., M.A., Ph.D., University of Arkansas 

Assistant Professor of Literature 
Alan W. Carlsten 

B.S.E.E., University of Oklahoma; B.D., 
McCormick Theological Seminary 

Chaplain, Associate Professor of Religion 
John W. Dixon, Jr. 

A.B., Emory and Henry College; Ph.D., 

University of Chicago 

Associate Professor of Art 
Everett H. Emerson 

A.B., Harvard University; M.A., Duke University; 

Ph.D., Louisiana State University 

Associate Professor of Literature 






Henry E. Genz 

A.B., Emory University; M.A. University of 
Wisconsin; Ph.D., Western Reserve University 
Associate Professor of French 
Robert Hall 

A.B., Wofford College; M.A., 
University of North Carolina 
Instructor of French 
Robert 0. Hodgell 

B.S., M.S., University of Wisconsin 
Assistant Professor of Art 
Keith W. Irwin 

A.B., Cornell College; B.D., Garret Biblical Institute 
Associate Professor of Religion and Philosophy 
Sara M. Ivey 

B.A., Duke University; M.A., Ph.D., 
Louisiana State University 
Associate Professor of Speech (part-time) 
E. Ashby Johnson 

A.B., Presbyterian College, South Carolina; B.D., 
Th.M., Th.D., Union Theological Seminary, Virginia 
Professor of Religion; Director of the Core Program 
Kenneth E. Keeton 

A.B., Georgetown College, Kentucky; M.A., 
University of Kentucky; Ph.D., University of 
North Carolina 

Assistant Professor of German 
Helmut Kreitz 

Abitur, Realgymnasium Aloysiuskolleg; Ph.D., 
Universitat des Saarlandes 
Instructor of Ger?nan 



Giovanni Previtali 

B.A., M.A., Oxford University, England; Ph.D., Yale 
University; LL.B., University of Virginia 
Professor of Spanish 

John Satterfield 

A.B., M.M., M.A., Ph.D., University of North Carolina 
Associate Professor of Music 
Julia Florence Sherbourne 

A.B., Taylor University; M.A., University of 
Michigan 

Assistant Professor of English and Reading 
William G. Thomson 

B.A., Ohvet College; M.A., Cornell University; Ed.D., 
University of Michigan 
Associate Professor of Classics 
Pedro Trakas 

A.B., Wofford College; M.A., University of Mexico; 
Ph.D., University of North Carolina 
Professor of Spanish 
William E. Waters 

A.B., University of North Carolina; M.Ed., 
William & Mary 
Assistant Professor of Music 
Frederic R. White 

A.B., M.A., Oberlin College; Ph.D., 
University of Michigan 

Professor of Classical and Comparative Literature 
Daniel A. Zaret 

Ph.D., University of Moscow 
Visiting Professor of Russian 



Division of 

History and the Social Sciences 

William C. Wilbur, Jr. 

A.B., Washington and Lee; Ph.D., 

Columbia University 

Chairman, Division of History and Social Sciences 

Professor of History 

John M. Bevan 

A.B., Franklin and Marshall; M.A., Ph.D., 

Duke University 
Professor of Psychology 
Clark Bouwman 

B.A., Kalamazoo College; B.S., Western Michigan 
University; M.A., Ph.D., New School for 
Social Research 
Associate Professor of Sociology 

Burr C. Brundage 

A.B., Amherst College; Ph.D., Oriental Institute, 

University of Chicago 
Professor of History 
Bettye Rae Crane 

B.S., Alabama Polytechnic Institute; M.A., 

University of Alabama 
Instructor of Physical Education 
Sania Hamady 

B.A., American University of Beirut; M.A., Michigan 

State University; Ph.D., University of Chicago 
Associate Professor of Social Anthropology 



William F. Harrison, Jr. 

B.S., Emory University; M.A., George Peabody College 

Assistant Professor of Library Science 
Albert V. Hollister 

B.S., State Teachers College, Mankato, Minnesota; 

M.A., Ed.D., George Peabody College 

Assistant Professor of Physical Education 
David K. Hosteller 

B.S., University of Tampa; M.A., University of 

Virginia 

Instructor in Education (part-ti?ne) 
Emil Kauder 

Ph.D., University of Berlin 

Professor of Economics 
Otis H. Shao 

B.A., St. John's University, Shanghai; M.A., 

University of Colorado; Ph.D., Brown University 

Associate Professor of Political Science 
J. Thomas West 

B.S., Davidson College; M.A., University of North 

Carolina; Ph.D., Vanderbilt University 

Assistant Professor of Psychology 
Fred H. Willhoite, Jr. 

A.B., Oklahoma Baptist University; A.M., Ph.D., 

Duke University 

Assistant Professor of Political Science 
Billy O. Wireman 

A.B., Georgetown University; M-A., University of 

Kentucky; Ed.D., George Peabody College 

Assistant Professor of Physical Education 



Division of 

Mathematics and the Natural Sciences 

Irving Gordon Foster 

B.S. in E.E., Virginia Military Institute; Ph.M., 

University of Wisconsin; Ph.D., University of Virginia 

Chairma)!, Division of Mathematics and the 
Natural Sciences 

Professor of Physics 
Forrest E. Dristy 

B.S., M.S., South Dakota School of Mines and 

Technology; Ph.D., Florida State University 

Assistant Professor of Mathematics 
Philip R. Ferguson 

B.A., M.A., Indiana University; Ph.D., University of 

North Carolina 

Assistant Professor of Chemistry 
Paul J. Haigh 

A.B., M.A., Miami University; Ph.D., 

University of Florida 

Assistant Professor of Physics 
John D. McCrone 

B.S., Ph.D., University of Florida 

Assistant Professor of Biology 
Robert C. Meacham 

A.B., Southwestern at Memphis; Sc.M., Ph.D., 

Brown University 

Professor of Mathematics 



George K. Reid 

B.S., Presbyterian College, South Carolina; 

M.S., Ph.D., University of Florida 

Professor of Biology 
Dudley E. South 

A.B., College of Wooster; M.A., Ph.D., University of 

Michigan 

Professor of Mathematics 
Dexter Squibb 

B.S., East Tennessee State College; Ph.D., 

University of Florida 

Assistant Professor of Chemistry 

The New Campus 

Starting m 1959, Florida Presbyterian College has pur- 
chased from the City of St. Petersburg two hundred and 
seventy-five acres on Boca Ciega Bay, seven miles from 
the center of the city. It is located on U. S. Highway 19 
and J4th Avenue, South, a quarter of a mile from the 
famous Sunshine Skyway. With a shoreline of a mile and 
a quarter, this is believed to be the only bayfront campus 
in the United States. 

In a colorful ceremony featuring gift shovels from 
one hundred and eighty-six other colleges and universities, 
the College broke ground on the new campus on September 
24, 1961. Before the end of that month construction had 
commenced on three buildings in the first building phase. 

The William Luther Cobb Library, gift of Mr. and 
Mrs. William Luther Cobb, Tarpon Springs, is designed 



•Mrt 




initially to hold 100,000 volumes. 

The Dendy-McNair Teaching Auditorium, gift of 
the First Presbyterian Church, Orlando, will serve mainly 
for the mass lectures given in connection with the College's 
unique core courses. It seats 450 and has a fully equipped 
stage. 

The Humanities Classroom Building, like the Dendy- 
McNair Teaching Auditorium a unit of the Humanities 
Complex, was made possible through an anonymous gift. 

Construction began in March, 1962, on three more 
units of the first building phase: two dormitory units 
designed to house 274 students and a dining unit where 
up to 420 persons can be fed at one sitting. 

All units in the first building phase were completed 
in September, 1962, and the college moved a major part 
of its operation to the new campus that month. 

Some students, the science staffs and laboratories, and 
most administrative offices will continue to be housed in 
the Interim Campus at the Maritime Base. 

Florida Presbyterian College has adopted a six-phase 
construction plan for completing its $12,500,000 campus. 



In 1963 the second phase will include the Science 
Center, a wing of the Administration Complex, one unit 
of the Student Union, the infirmary, additional residence 
houses, athletic facilities, and necessary utilities and roads. 

Following the ten-year plan drawn up by the College, 
the building needs of Florida Presbyterian College are 
predicated on an anticipated student body of 1,500 by 
1972. Included in this growth is an Applied Science and 
Engineering Curriculum to which students were admitted 
for the first time in September, 1962. 

When this goal of 1,500 students has been achieved, 
Florida Presbyterian College will turn its attention toward 
developing a university system which probably will make 
available graduate work in many varied fields of study. 
The two hundred and seventy-five acres of the campus 
can accommodate a maximum of thirty-five hundred 
students. 

Architects for Florida Presbyterian College are: 

Perkins & Will, Chicago 

Connell, Pierce, Garland & Friedman, Miami 

Jefferson Hamilton, Consultant, Gainesville 



■*;.f^- >. 







Courses of 
Instruction 



II 

1963 
1964 




Introduction 

The number of each course conveys the following information: 

Courses number 100 to 199 are primarily for freshmen, 200 to 299 for sophomores, 300 to 399 for 
juniors and seniors, and 400 to 499 for seniors. Courses offered only in alternate years are indicated 
by "a" (for school years beginning in even-numbered years) and "b" (for school years in odd- 
numbered years). In general, an odd number indicates that the course is given in the first semester; 
an even number indicates that the course is given in the second semester. 

Before students enroll in any course, they are to seek advice of their faculty advisers. Near the close 
of the school year each freshman is expected to prepare a tentative course program for the remaining 
three years of college and to present it to his adviser for critical evaluation and counsel. At the end 
of the second year of study each student must submit for approval to the Committee on academic 
Review his projected program. A student may revise his program at any time thereafter with the approval 
of a major professor. 

The courses are listed as core courses, which all students take, and according to academic divisions 
and academic disciplines or fields of study within each division. Courses are conducted typically in three 
lecture-discussion periods per week supplemented by other periods, studios, or laboratories. 

Course descriptions are not given for the Junior Seminars and Senior Seminars because a professor 
is free to vary his offerings each year according to student interest and his own study and research. Stu- 
dents receiving the endorsement of the professors in their major field may take the equivalent of two 
courses each semester during their junior and senior years in a program of guided independent study. 



Core Courses 

The basic objective is to develop within the college community a critical understanding 
of some of the major attempts of man to interpret his experience through the analytic and 
historical study of works and institutions. Throughout, the concern is with the relevance of 
the Judeo-Christian tradition and of the redemptive message of the Bible in human inquiry. 
The course thus forms the basis for the total educational process at Florida Presbyterian 
College. Students participate in large and small groups: three lectures and two hour-and- 
a-half discussions during the first two years; two lectures in the third year and one 
hour-and-a-half discussion; one lecture and one two-hour discussion in the fourth year. 

101, 102 WESTERN CIVILIZATION AND ITS CHRISTIAN HERITAGE 

201, 202 WESTERN CIVILIZATION AND ITS CHRISTIAN HERITAGE 

}01, 302 ASIAN STUDIES 

401, 402 CHRISTIAN FAITH AND GREAT ISSUES 

The Division of Humanities 

Art 

Requirements for a Major: (a) Art 201, 202, and six other courses in art; (b) sup- 
porting work in other areas of the humanities, history, sociology, psychology, and, in some 
cases, studio work and mathematics. 

201 INTRODUCTION TO THE ANALYSIS OF ART 

This course investigates the major elements of the artistic language and the various 
ways in which they have been used in the creation of works of art. A regular and co- 
ordinated series of exercises develops the student's ability to analyze a work of art. 

202 INTRODUCTION TO THE HISTORY OF ART 

This course sketches the historical development of the major artistic styles and the 
relation of art works to the social, economic, and political context out of which they arose. 



251, 252 STUDIO 

307, 302 HISTORY OF ART 

Subjects and areas considered in these courses will vary according to the availability 
of material and the needs of the students. Typical studies: classical, medieval, northern 
Renaissance, Italian Renaissance, Baroque, modern architecture, modern painting. 

Prerequisite: Art 201 or 202. 

151, 532 JUNIOR SEMINAR, INDEPENDENT STUDY, RESEARCH 

351, 3 52 STUDIO 

401, 402 INDIVIDUAL STUDIES IN THE HISTORY AND CRITICISM OF ART 

Guided reading and study, to be defined by the needs of the student. 
Prerequisite: Art 201 or 202. 

431, 432 SENIOR SEMINAR, INDEPENDENT STUDY, RESEARCH 

Studies in individual artists, movements, genres, media, countries. 

422a ART OF THE CHRISTIAN CHURCH 

The relations between art and worship, art as a manifestation of theological attitudes, 
and art as a critique of the church. 
Prerequisite: Art 201 or 202. 

451, 452 STUDIO 

Languages and Literature 

Requirements for a Major: Students may major in (1) a single language (e.g., French, 
German, English) with supporting work in another language or other languages or in Gen- 
eral Literature or (2) General Literature with advanced work in one or more foreign 
languages or in English and American Literature. The junior and senior courses (301, 302, 
and 401, 402, and 411, 412) are required for a major. 

42 



Foreign Languages 

CHINESE (projected), FRENCH, GERMAN, GREEK, ITALIAN (projected), LATIN, 

RUSSIAN, SPANISH. 

Instruction in foreign language consists of classroom and laboratory work. Elementary 
and intermediate courses train in grammar, vocabulary, pronunciation, composition, and 
reading. The progression is from aural comprehension to oral expression to reading to 
writing. Courses 101 through 302 deal with all these elements in order of increasing dif- 
ficulty. Proficiency in reading, writing, and (in modern languages) conversation — not the 
completion of a program of studies — is the measure of accomplishment and admission to 
advanced studies. The third-year literature course requires a reading knowledge of the 
language and in appropriate cases the ability to converse. The readings course (401, 402) 
and the Senior Seminar (411, 412) are designed each semester to meet students' needs and 
proficiencies. They may deal with authors, genres, movements, or works. They arc open in 
appropriate cases to nonmajors wishing to read the literature in translation. 

101, 102 ELEMENTARY 

201, 202 INTERMEDIATE 

301, 302 INTRODUCTION TO LITERATURE 

ill, 312 ADVANCED COMPOSITION AND CONVERSATION 

Designed particularly for future teachers. An analysis of the structure of the language. 

401, 402 READINGS 

Typical subjects: 
French: Racine, Flaubert, the novel, essays, romanticism, enlightenment, A la recherche du 

temps perdu. La comedic humaine. 
German: Goethe, Schiller, Hesse, lyric poetry, nineteenth-century drama, contemporary 

novel. 
Greek: Xenophon, Homer, tragedy. New Testament, Hesiod, Thucydides, lyric poetry, 

Aristophanes. 



Latin: Lucretius, amatory and satiric poetry, Tacitus. 
Russian: Dostoevsky, Pushkin, Tolstoy. 
Spanish: Cervantes, golden-age drama, Cid. 

4U, 452 SENIOR SEMINAR, INDEPENDENT STUDY, RESEARCH 

English Language and Literature 

101, 102 COMPOSITION: MECHANICS AND ORGANIZATION 

For freshmen who demonstrate inadequate proficiency in written English. 

Ill, 112 READING WORKSHOP 

For any students needing or desiring to improve their reading abilities. 

}01, 302 HISTORY OF LITERATURE 

401, 402 READINGS IN ENGLISH AND AMERICAN LITERATURE 

Designed each semester to meet students' needs. May be authors, genres, movements, 
works. 

4)1, 432 SENIOR SEMINAR, INDEPENDENT STUDY, RESEARCH 

General Literature 

Reading in General Literature is in the English language or in a foreign language in 
which the student has demonstrated proficiency. 

Requirements for a Major: a balanced program in criticism, composition, literary his- 
tory, and language. 

201, 202 WORLD MASTERPIECES 

Works in English selected from a group of literary masterpieces of many countries, 
genres, and periods. 



307 LITERARY CRITICISM 

The literature, vocabulary, and practice of literary analysis and evaluation. 

}02 LITERARY MOVEMENTS 

The study of literature illuminating and illuminated by its historical classification 
(e.g., romanticism, naturalism). 

■121 IMAGINATIVE WRITING 

The writing of fiction, drama, verse, persuasion, exposition. 

ni, 532 JUNIOR SEMINAR, INDEPENDENT STUDY, RESEARCH 

The subjects may be authors, genres, movements, works. Readings will be in the 
English language or in a foreign language in which the student has demonstrated profi- 
ciency. 

401, 402 READINGS 

Typical Subjects: Shakespeare, Sophocles, Dante, Balzac, Schiller, Lorca, Melville, 
Tagore, No plays, Persian lyrics, Chinese philosophers, the Koran, the Mahabharata. 

431, 4)2 SENIOR SEMINAR, INDEPENDENT STUDY, RESEARCH 

Music 

Requirements for a Major: Music 101, 102, 201, 202, and six additional courses; applied 
music and participation in an ensemble. 

101, 102 THEORY OF TONAL HARMONY 

Analysis and composition in small homophonic forms. Instruction in harmony, nota- 
tion, dictation, sight reading, ear training, and keyboard harmony. 

201, 202 ADVANCED THEORY OF TONAL HARMONY 

Analysis and composition in more complex homophonic forms. Prerequisite: Music 102. 

}01 THEORY OF MODAL COUNTERPOINT 

Analysis and composition in the style of Palestrina. Prerequisite: Music 202. 



5 02 THEORY OF TONAL COUNTERPOINT 

Analysis and composition in tfte style of Bach. Prerequisite: Music 202. May be taken 
prior to Music 301 with permission of the instructor. 

3//, )12 SURVEY OF MUSIC 

Music literature in its relation to general cultural history. Designed for students 
majoring in fields other than music. 

■*01 OPyCHESTRATION AND CONDUCTING 

Practical work in the writing of scores and in baton and rehearsal techniques. Pre- 
requisite: Music 301, 302, or permission of the instructor. 

-^02 ADVANCED FORM, ANALYSIS AND COMPOSITION 

Seminar in the study and making of larger homophonic and polyphonic forms. Pre- 
requisite: Music 301, 302. 

4)1, 432 SENIOR SEMINAR, INDEPENDENT STUDY, RESEARCH 

Studies in history of musical styles. Prerequisite: Music 301, 302. 

Applied Music 

Individual instruction is offered in voice, organ, piano, wind, brass, and string instru- 
ments. Freshmen and sophomores receive credit of one hour for a semester of individually 
instructed applied music, upperclassmen two hours. A music major must earn twelve hours. 

Freshmen and sophomores earn an hour for a year of ensemble participation, upperclass- 
men two. A music major must participate in an ensemble during each semester of residence 
and earn for graduation a minimum of six hours. 

Philosophy 

Requirements for a Major: Philosophy 211, 301, 302, 401, 402, 331 or 332, 431 or 
432, and one additional course. 

Requirements for a Philosophy and Religion Major with emphasis in Philosophy: Phil- 
osophy 211, 301, 302, 401, 402, 431 or 432, and two courses in Religion. 



201, 202 LOGIC 

A study of the elements of inductive and deductive logical systems with particular 
emphasis on symbolic logic and scientific method. 

211 ETHICS 

Main types of ethical theory and their implications for contemporary problems of 
personal and social morality. 

}0l HISTORY OF GREEK AND ROMAN PHILOSOPHY 

A study from primary sources of philosophy from the pre-Socratics through Plotinus 
with basic attention to the nature of metaphysical problems. 

301 HISTORY OF MEDIEVAL AND RENAISSANCE PHILOSOPHY 

A study from primary sources of philosophy from Augustine to Descartes with basic 
attention to the relationship between faith and reason. 

3)1, 332 JUNIOR SEMINAR, INDEPENDENT STUDY, RESEARCH 

A study of selected topics on the relationship between philosophy and other academic 
disciplines, such as the philosophy of science, the philosophy of culture, esthetics, the phil- 
osophy of religion, social philosophy, etc. These seminars are designed for either the major 
in philosophy or the major in one of the related fields. 

401 HISTORY OF MODERN PHILOSOPHY 

A study from primary sources of philosophy from Descartes through Hegel with basic 
attention to problems of knowledge. 

402 CONTEMPORARY PHILOSOPHICAL MOVEMENTS 

A study from primary sources of the major philosophical movements of the nineteenth 
and twentieth century such as voluntarism, existentialism, the analytic movement, process 
philosophy, with emphasis on their treatment of crucial modern problems. 

431, 432 SENIOR SEMINAR, INDEPENDENT STUDY, RESEARCH 

A study in depth of the work of selected individual philosophers. 

47 



Religion 

Requirements for a Major: Religion 201, 202, 301, 302, 331, 332, 431, 432. 
Requirements for a Major in Philosophy and Religion with emphasis in Religion: Religion 
201, 202, 301, 302; Philosophy 301, 302; two seminars, one in Religion and one in 
Philosophy. 

201 INTRODUCTION TO THE OLD TESTMENT 

An inductive inquiry into the literary form and religious insights of the Hebrew 
Scriptures. 

^02 INTRODUCTION TO THE NEW TESTAMENT 

An inductive inquiry into the literary form and religious insights of the earliest Chris- 
tian documents. 

30/, W2 HISTORY OF CHRISTIAN THOUGHT 

A detailed study of Christian thought as it appears in the writings of representative 
leaders and movements from the Apostolic Age to the Reformation. Second semester: the 
Reformation to the present. 

33/, 332 JUNIOR SEMINAR, INDEPENDENT STUDY, RESEARCH 

4)1, 432 SENIOR SEMINAR, INDEPENDENT STUDY, RESEARCH 

The interests and needs of students determine the subjects in both Junior and Senior 
Seminars. Possible topics: comparative religion, contemporary theological movements, indi- 
vidual books of the Bible, individual theologians, devotional classics, problems in Christian 
ethics. 

Speech 

201 ENGLISH PHONETICS 

The sound system of speech, emphasis on the use of IPA alphabet; elementary vocal 
anatomy; fundamentals of the science of sound. 



202 THE SPEAKING VOICE 

Principles and practice of interpretation and communication of written materials 
principles and practice of group discussion. 

^01 PRINCIPLES OF THE THEATRE 



The Division of History and the Social Sciences 
History 



Requirements for a Major: History 311 and seven additional courses. 

201, 202 HISTORY OF THE UNITED STATES 

The development of American society in government, economic life, and culture. 

^^^* ANCIENT HISTORY 

The ancient world from prehistoric times to the decline of the Roman Empire. 

301a MEDIEVAL HISTORY 

The history of Western Europe from the decline of the Roman Empire through the 
thirteenth century. 

i02a RENAISSANCE AND REFORMATION 

The history of Western Europe from the fourteenth through the sixteenth century. 
}03a, }04a HISTORY OF ENGLAND AND MODERN BRITAIN 

The first semester treats the history of the English people to 1688. The second semester 
traces the development of a modern industrial society and its imperial expansion. 

3J1 INTRODUCTION TO HISTORIOGRAPHY AND HISTORICAL METHOD 

An introduction to the techniques of historical research and writing, the use of sources, 
and the examination of selected classics of historical interpretation. 



Ulh HISTORY 0¥ MODERN RUSSIA 

Russia from the accession of Peter the Great to the present, with emphasis on the period 
since the 1917 revolution. 

322b HISTORY OF MODERN LATIN AMERICA 

Latin-American republics from their independence to the present. 

331, 332 JUNIOR SEMINAR, INDEPENDENT STUDY, RESEARCH 

'>12a HISTORY OF AMERICAN FOREIGN POLICY 

American foreign policy considered as part of the larger problem of American par- 
ticipation n world affairs. 

401b EUROPE FROM THE FRENCH REVOLUTION TO WORLD WAR 1 

The French Revolution, the Industrial Revolution, political and social movements of 
the nineteenth century, and the background of World War I. 

402b TWENTIETH CENTURY EUROPE 

The failure of the Versailles settlement; the collapse of the European economy; the 
rise of totalitarianism and the crisis of democracy; international relations and World War 
II; the Cold War and recent problems of Europe. 

411b, 412b AMERICAN SOCIAL HISTORY 

Selected topics in American social history from the colonial period to the present. 

431, 432 SENIOR SEMINAR, INDEPENDENT STUDY, RESEARCH 

Economics and Business Administration 

Requirements for a Major: (a) eight courses including Economics 201, 202, 301, 403, 
431, 432; (b) Mathematics 211. Students wishing to emphasize Business rather th:m Eco- 
nomics will substitute Economics 211 for Economics 301. 

201, 202 PRINCIPLES OF ECONOMICS 

The modern income approach and the neo-classical price approach. 



211, 212 PRINCIPLES OF ACCOUNTING 

Intended to provide a general knowledge of accounting practices. The theory and 
construction of financial statements. Laboratory training. 

}0I HISTORY OF ECONOMIC THOUGHT 

Development of economic analysis from early classicism to the modern period. The 
orthodox movements: classicism, the Marshallian and the Post-Marshallian systems, the 
Austrian school. The opposition: the historical school, institutionalism, Marx, Keynes, and 
their followers. 

n2h INTRODUCTION TO BUSINESS 

Designed to give the student general knowledge of the various activities of a business, 
such as production and marketing. 

}22 MONEY AND BANKING 

Functions of money, the currency systems, the exchange equation, and the circulation 
of money; the Federal Reserve System. 

.i2}h LABOR ECONOMICS 

The development, structure, goals, and policies of labor organizations; major issues in 
labor-management relations; and public policy toward labor unions. 

U7, }}2 JUNIOR SEMINAR, INDEPENDENT STUDY, RESEARCH 

)52h INTERNATIONAL ECONOMY 

The regulation of foreign trade. Theoretical analysis, comparative advantages, balance 
of payments. Foreign trade of the United States, the underdeveloped countries. 

401a PUBLIC FINANCE 

Shifting and incidence of taxation. The countervailing fiscal policy. Federal, state, 
and municipal taxation. 

40} INTERMEDIATE THEORY 

The theory of games. Linear approach. 



411 BUSINESS CYCLES 

Statistical observations; theories of growth; modern explanations of cycles. Survey of 
cycles after 1929. 

■^l^b COMPARATIVE ECONOMIC SYSTEMS 

Theory of Capitalistic Society, Marxism, Leninism, and the Modern Russian Economy. 
43/, 4)2 SENIOR SEMINAR, INDEPENDENT STUDY, RESEARCH 

Education 

Students considering a teaching career in secondary schools should seek counsel on 
their course program early in their college training. In this way their course schedules can 
be planned to meet certification requirements. 

201 HISTORY AND PHILOSOPHY OF EDUCATION 

The development of the public-school system and contemporary issues and historical 
philosophies of education; the role of the school in a democratic society. 

202 EDUCATIONAL PSYCHOLOGY 

The application of psychological principles to the work of the school. Learning, moti- 
vation, forgetting, transfer of training, and personality adjustment. 

}0I PRINCIPLES OF TEACHING AND ADMINISTRATION 

New teaching techniques adapted to instructional programs of secondary schools; 
aspects of administration for classroom teachers; organization, finance, personnel, super- 
vision, scheduling, and activities. 

302 MATERIALS AND METHODS IN SECONDARY EDUCATION 

A survey and critical analysis of the methods and curriculum of secondary-school 
teaching. Special methods, materials, and techniques used in the specific subject for which 
certification is requested. Instruction in principles of diagnosis and developmental teaching. 

303 SPECIAL METHODS 

Emphasis on specific teaching methods in the subject field for certification. 



}n CHILD PSYCHOLOGY (See Psychology) 

312 PSYCHOLOGICAL MEASUREMENT (See Psychology) 

}21 SECONDARY -SCHOOL CURRICULUM 

The purpose, philosophy, structures, and procedures developed as a unified whole. 

401 ORGANIZATION OF LIBRARY MATERIALS 

Instruction in the fundamental principles of the organization of small libraries; pro- 
cedures of acquisition, preparation, classification, and cataloguing. 

402 REFERENCE AND BIBLIOGRAPHY 

A study of general reference books and reference materials in specific subjects 
appropriate to school and community use. Evaluation, selection, and uses. 

412 READING METHOD 

Instruction and practice in ways of improving reading ability, particularly of high- 
school students. 

421, 422 STUDENT TEACHING 

Observation and teaching activities in high schools in the vicinity of the college. 

Political Science 

Requirements for a Major: Political Science 201, 202, 211, 301 or 302, 311 or 312, 
and four additional courses. 

Requirements for a Major: Political Science 201, 202, 303, 311, 312, and four additional 
courses. 

201 PRINCIPLES OF GOVERNMENT AND POLITICS 

Introduction to political science, with some attention to scope and methods of the 
discipline. Emphasis on the great issues of politics and government. 

202 AMERICAN NATIONAL GOVERNMENT AND POLITICS 

Theory and practice of modern constitutional democracy through analysis of constitu- 



tional foundations, patterns of politics, and the structure and functioning of national gov- 
ernment in the United States. 

Wlb FOREIGN AND COMPARATIVE POLITICAL SYSTEMS 

Formal governmental structures and political processes in the major constitutional states 
of Western Europe: Great Britain, France, and Germany. 

3021? FOREIGN AND COMPARATIVE POLITICAL SYSTEMS 

Internal government and politics and interrelationships of the Soviet Union, Soviet 
bloc states, and China. 

3 0} INTERNATIONAL RELATIONS 

Forces and forms of politics among nations. The modern state system, nationalism, 
internationalism, imperialism, foreign policies, war and cold war. Balance of power, morality, 
organization, and the law as restraints on the power struggle. Problems of world stability 
and peaceful change. 

nici WESTERN POLITICAL THOUGHT 

Main currents in political theory since Machiavelli. 

}2hi AMERICAN STATE AND LOCAL GOVERNMENT 

Constitutional structures, political processes, and problems of state and municipal gov- 
ernments and intergovernmental relations. 

3n, 332 JUNIOR SEMINAR, INDEPENDENT STUDY, RESEARCH 

401a AMERICAN FOREIGN POLICY 

Formulation and execution of American foreign policy. Analysis of substantive issues 
in recent and contemporary policies. 

411 b INTRODUCTION TO CONSTITUTIONAL LAW 

Some major problems of United States constitutional interpretation and development, 
with emphasis on reading and analysis of Supreme Court opinions. 



41 2h POLITICS AND POLICY FORMATION 

Forces, institutions, and processes in the competition for power and policy, with special 
reference to the United States. Public opinion, propaganda, political behavior, interest groups, 
leadership, and particularly political parties and the legislative process. 

431, 4} 2 SENIOR SFMINAR, INDEPENDENT STUDY, RESEARCH 

Physical Education 

A two-year program of physical education is required of all students. The objective 
is to develop in the student an attitude towa.-d leisure and physical activity so that he can 
select, participate in, and enjoy the sports most appropriate to his needs and interests. 
Everyone is expected to demonstrate proficiency in swimming some time during the first 
semester of the first year. The two-year course includes one hour of lecture-discussion and 
two hours of demonstration-participation each week. The fourth semester completes the 
program. No student is excused from the program; when circumstances prevent partici- 
pation in the regular program, an appropriate set of activities will be arranged for individual 
needs. 

101, 102 PHYSICAL EDUCATION 

201, 202 The lecture periods will be devoted to the following: history and philosophy of phys- 

ical education; physical education in modern living, and rules and strategy of the most 
popular sports. The laboratory periods will be devoted to golf, tennis, sailing, fencing, 
tumbling, bowling, trampolining, riding, swimming, track and field, badminton, boating, 
and other recreational activities. During the two-year program a student will receive instruc- 
tion in eight of these activities. Students choose the activities so far as possible. The pro- 
gram is primarily coeducational. 

Psychology 

Requirements for a Major: (a) Psychology 201, 202 and six additional courses which 
may include Education 202; (b) Mathematics 211 for those students contemplating graduate 
study in Psychology. Psychology 201 is prerequisite to all other courses and Mathematics 
211 for Psychology 422 (exceptions with permission). 

55 



201 PRINCIPLES OF BEHAVIOR 

Major concepts, methods, and problems involved in the study of human behavior. 

202 PRINCIPLES OF INDIVIDUAL BEHAVIOR 

Emphasis on the processes which contribute to personality. 

^01 a BEHAVIOR DISORDERS 

Origins, classifications, care and treatment of the common behavioral disorders. 

i02a SOCIAL PSYCHOLOGY 

The influence of social variables on the behavior of the individual; social perception, 
language, attitudes, propaganda; social problems. 

^'^^ CHILD PSYCHOLOGY 

Basic psychological principles in the study of the child from birth to puberty. 

312b PSYCHOLOGICAL MEASUREMENT 

The construction, administration, and interpretation of group and individual tests of 
intelligence, personality, interests, and achievement. Laboratory training. 

521 EXPERIMENTAL PSYCHOLOGY 

Scientific methodology, critical evaluation of classical and contemporary research par- 
ticularly in motivation, learning, and perception. Some opportunity for individual research. 

331, 352 JUNIOR SEMINAR, INDEPENDENT STUDY, RESEARCH 

401a PERSONALITY THEORY 

Theories of personality examined in the light of recent research. 

402a BUSINESS AND INDUSTRIAL PSYCHOLOGY 

Psychological procedures in employment selection, training, efficiency, and human 
relations. 

411b SYSTEMS OF PSYCHOLOGY 

Integrative theories, including Structuralism, Functionalism, Behaviorism, Hormic Psy- 
chology, Gestalt Psychology, and Psychoanalysis. 



412 PHYSIOLOGICAL PSYCHOLOGY 

Physiological correlates of behavior. Special emphasis on the nervous system. 

422 ADVANCED EXPERIMENTAL PSYCHOLOGY 

Critical evaluation and design of research: crucial experiments and controversial issues; 
individual research. Prerequisite: Mathematics 211. 

43], 4U SENIOR SEMINAR, INDEPENDENT STUDY, RESEARCH 

Sociology and Anthropology 

Requirements for a Major: (;i) Sociology 201, 202, 401, and five additional courses; 
(b) Mathematcs 211 for those contemplating graduate work in Sociology. 

102 SOCIOLOGY OF MARRIAGE 

American practice and attitudes with respect to dating, courtship, and preparation for 
marriage. 

201 GENERAL ANTHROPOLOGY 

An introduction to the fields of archeology, cultural and physical anthropology. 

202 PRINCIPLES OE SOCIOLOGY 

The study and application of major sociological concepts, social processes, institutions, 
structure, and group relations. 

U)lh THE FAMILY 

Examination of the origins of family institutions and contemporary processes in the 
formation of the family, its functions, and organization. 

i02 SOCIAL WORK 

A survey of the fields and methods of social work. 

Ulci MINORITIES 

Problems associated with identification of minority groups — racial, religious, ethnic. 

n2ti CRIMINOLOGY 

The nature, causes, prevention of crime and the treatment of criminals. 



}14b THE COMMUNITY 

Contemporary rural and urban life. An introduction to human ecology and demography. 

}16 CULTURAL ANTHROPOLOGY 

Theory and methods of anthropology related to areas of special interest. 

}}1, }}2 JUNIOR SEMINAR, INDEPENDENT STUDY, RESEARCH 

401 SOCIAL THEORY 

Systematic analysis of major contributions to the field of social thought since Comte. 

411, 412 FIELD EXPERIENCE IN SOCIAL WORK 

Field experience and observation under the supervision of professionally qualified 
social workers in selected local agencies. Must be taken for full year and counts as one 
course. Prerequisite: Sociology 302. 

437, 432 SENIOR SEMINAR, INDEPENDENT STUDY, RESEARCH 

The Division of Mathematics and the Natural Sciences 
Mathematics 

Requirements for a Major: Mathematics 202 (the calculus sequence) and eight addi- 
tional courses. 

101 FINITE MATHEMATICS 

Logic, truth tables, sets and relations, number systems and counting, probability 
theory, vectors and matrices, linear programming, and theory of games. 

/ / 1 PRINCIPLES OF MATHEMATICS I 

Logic, groups, ordered fields, sets, function concept, circular functions. Required of 
students who have not had trigonometry. 

112 PRINCIPLES OF MATHEMATICS II 

Algebraic, exponential, and logarithmic functions, analytic geometry, and calculus. 
Prerequisite: Mathematics 101 or 111. 

58 



^00, 201 CALCULUS WITH ANALYTIC GEOMETRY 

202 Plane analytic geometry integrated with calculus of polynomials; transcendental func- 

tions, formal integration, and applications; infinite series, solid analytic geometry, and 
calculus of functions of several variables. Prerequisite: Mathematics 101 or 111. 

211 INTRODUCTION TO STATISTICS 

Discrete and continuous distribution functions, sampling distributions, statistical infer- 
ence, regression and correlation. Laboratory training. Prerequisite: Mathematics 112 or 200. 

}01, 302 DIFFERENTIAL EQUATIONS 

The solution of ordinary differential equations, both linear and non-linear, including 
series solutions and numerical methods; existence theorems, stability considerations; intro- 
duction to partial differential equations. Prerequisite: Mathematics 202. 

311a MODERN ALGEBRA 

Topics from groups, rings, fields, vector spaces, matrices. Prerequisite: Mathematics 
202 or consent. 

331,332 JUNIOR SEMINAR, INDEPENDENT STUDY, RESEARCH 

401 h, 402b ADVANCED CALCULUS 

Topics from advanced calculus and functions of a real variable. Prerequisite: Mathe- 
matics 202. 

431, 432 SENIOR SEMINAR, INDEPENDENT STUDY, RESEARCH 

Biology 

Requirements for a Major: (a) Biology 101, 102, and eight additional courses in Biology, 
depending upon the interest of the student; (b) Chemistry 301, 302, and (c) Physics 
201, 202. 
101, 102 GENERAL BIOLOGY 

Provides an understanding of and appreciation of biological mechanisms and principles 
through critical analysis of life processes and synthesis of basic facts and concepts. The nature 



of living matter, the cell and protoplasm, metabolism, reproduction, development, inherit- 
ance, the organism and its environment, and evolution. Lecture 3 hours; laboratory 3 hours. 

201 COMPARATIVE VERTEBRATE ANATOMY 

A study of the structure and evolutionary development of the organs and systems of 
representatives of the phylum Chordata. Morphology in relation to classification, mode of 
life, and adaptation to the environment. Lecture 2 hours; laboratory 6 hours by arrange- 
ment. Prerequisite: Biology 101, 102. 

202 VERTEBRATE EMBRYOLOGY 

The study of the development of the vertebrate body from single-celled egg to hatch- 
ing or birth. The formation of organ-systems and the experimental approach to animal 
development. Lecture discussion 3 hours; laboratory 3 hours. Prerequisite: Biology 201. 
211, 212 j-^£ pj[^^2Vr KINGDOM 

A survey of the plant kingdom with emphasis on structure, reproduction, and evolu- 
tion of representative types of all major groups of plants. Laboratory includes field 
collections and detailed study of selected specimens. Lecture-discussion 3 hours; laboratory 
3 hours. Prerequisite: Biology 101, 102. 

5 0i ORGANIC EVOLUTION 

Current theories of the origin of life, the phylogenetic relationships of living organisms. 
Darwinian and neo-Darwinian concepts of evolutionary mechanisms. Genetics and isolation, 
and the relationship of human culture, and the impact of Darwinism. Discussion 3 hours. 
Prerequisite: Biology 101, 102. 
^02 FIELD BOTANY 

A study of the distribution and identification of plants in the St. Petersburg area, 
especially the taxonomy, biogeography, and evolution of flowering plants. Laboratory and 
field trips. Lecture-discussion 2 hours; laboratory 3 hours. Prerequisite: Biology 101, 102. 

5 / 1 GENETICS 

Fundamental principles and mechanisms of inheritance. Lecture-discussion 2 hours; 
laboratory 3 hours. Prerequisite: Biology 101, 102, and Mathematics 101, or consent of 
instructor. 



.5 72 ECOLOGY 

Physical, chemical, and biological interrelationships in a natural community. Environ- 
mental factors, populations, the community concept, traffic in energy and biogeochemical 
cycles, and social organizations of animal groups. Field work essentially aquatic, in nearby 
freshwater lakes and Gulf bays. Lecture-discussion } hours; laboratory 3 hours. Prerequisite: 
Biology 101, 102. 

32/ INVERTEBRATE ZOOLOGY 

A study of the morphology, reproduction, physiology, and adaptive radiation in inver- 
tebrate animals. Laboratory includes field collections and detailed study of speciments. 
Lecture-discussion 3 hours; laboratory 3 hours. Prerequisite: Biology 101, 102. 

jj/, j J2 JUNIOR SEMINAR, INDEPENDENT STUDY, RESEARCH 

401 PHYSIOLOGY 

The functional relationships of the animal body. Cellular metabolism and the physics 
and chemistry of organic substances. Lecture-discussion 3 hours; laboratory 3 hours. Pre- 
requisite: Biology 101, 102, Chemistry 101, 102, and Physics 201, 202. 

402h HISTOLOGY AND MICROTECHNIQUES 

The microscopic nature of cells and tissues of organisms. Critical study of prepared 
slides, staining technique, slide preparation, and advanced use of the microscope. Lecture- 
discussion 3 hours; laboratory 3 hours. Prerequisite: Biology 101, 102. 

-/5/, 432 SENIOR SEMINAR, INDEPENDENT STUDY, RESEARCH 

Chemistry 

Requirements for a Major: (a) Chemistry 101, 102, 201, 202, 301, 302, 401, 402, and 
four additional chemistry courses; (b) Physics 201, 202; (c) Mathematics 202. German 
is recommended for the language requirement and Mathematics 301 as elective. 

101, 102 MODERN GENERAL CHEMISTRY 

Basic principles of chemistry, recent developments; relationships of structures to chem- 
ical and physical properties of chemical species; descriptive chemistry of familiar elements 



and compounds; introduction to detection and separation of selected ions. Lecture 3 hours; 
laboratory 3 hours. 

201, 202 ANALYTICAL CHEMISTRY 

Chemical equilibria and complex formation, stoichiometry, volumetric and gravimetric 
techniques, selected instrumental procedures, statistical treatment of errors. Lecture 2 
hours; laboratory 6 hours. Prerequisite: Chemistry 101, 102. 

}01, 302 ORGANIC CHEMISTRY 

Aliphatic and aromatic carbon compounds. Emphasis on methods of synthesis, reaction 
mechanisms, structural theory. Laboratory techniques and synthetic methods of preparation 
stressed. Lecture 3 hours; laboratory 3 hours. Prerequisite: Chemistry 101, 102. 

3//« TOPICS IN INORGANIC CHEMISTRY 

Lectures and seminars stressing periodic classification of elements and correlation of 
structures and properties of chemical species. Atomic and molecular structure and bonding, 
modern acid-base theory, inorganic nomenclature, co-ordination complexes, metal carbonyls, 
etc. Laboratory work in inorganic syntheses. Lecture 2 hours; laboratory 3 hours. Prerequi- 
site: Chemistry 101, 102. 

^^2« TOPICS IN INSTRUMENTAL ANALYSIS 

Introduction to electrometric pH measurement, conductometric and electrometric 
titration, polarography, colorimetry, spectrophotometry, etc., in theory and laboratory appli- 
cations. Lecture 1 hour; laboratory 6 hours. Prerequisite: Chemistry 201, 202. 

331, 332 JUNIOR SEMINAR, INDEPENDENT STUDY, RESEARCH 

401, 402 PHYSICAL CHEMISTRY 

Principles of theoretical chemistry. Studies of states of matter, elementary thermody- 
namics, colloids, solutions, homogeneous and heterogeneous equilibria, reaction kinetics, 
atomic structure, electrochemistry, and the use of physico-chemical apparatus. Lecture 3 
hours; laboratory 3 hours. Prerequisite: consent of instructor. 

411b TOPICS IN QUALITATIVE ORGANIC ANALYSIS 

Qualitative detection of functional groups, identification, characterization, and typical 



reactions used in proof of structure of organic compounds. Lecture 1 hour; laboratory 6 
hours. Prerequisite: Chemistry 301, 302. 

412b TOPICS IN ADVANCED ORGANIC CHEMISTRY 

Lectures or seminars concerned with resonance theory, reaction mechanisms, molecular 
rearrangements, free radicals, stereoisomerism, etc. Use of chemical library, research tech- 
niques, and organic syntheses. Lecture 2 hours; laboratory 3 hours. Prerequisite: Chemistry 
301, 302. 

422 TOPICS IN ADVANCED PHYSICAL CHEMISTRY 

Lectures or seminars concerned with thermodynamics, solutions and phase equilibria, 
nuclear chemistry, particles and waves, structure of matter, kinetics, surface chemistry, 
etc. Use of chemical library and various physico-chemical research techniques. Lecture 2 
hours; laboratory 3 hours. Prerequisite: consent of instructor. 

431, 432 SENIOR SEMINAR, INDEPENDENT STUDY, RESEARCH 

Physics 

Requirements for a Major: (a) Physics 201, 202, 301, 302, 321, 322, 401, 402, 421, 
422, (b) Mathematics 200, 201, 202, 301, 302. 

101, 102 INTRODUCTION TO PHYSICAL SCIENCE 

A study of the discovery and growth of basic physical theories from Galileo to the 
present. The meaning of science and scientific method. Lecture 3 hours; laboratory 3 hours. 

201, 202 GENERAL PHYSICS 

The concepts and theories of physics on an elementary level, including topics of 
mechanics, wave motion, sound, heat, optics, electricity and magnetism, and modern physics. 
Lecture 3 hours; laboratory 3 hours. Prerequisite: Mathematics 200. 

307, 302 MODERN PHYSICAL THEORIES 

Basic concepts of modern physical theories from 1900 to the present. Lecture 3 hours. 
Prerequisite: Physics 201, 202, Mathematics 201, 202. 



.52/ , }22 ADVANCED LABORATORY AND TECHNIQUES 

A series of intermediate-level experiments chosen by each student with the consent of 
the instructor. Instruction in such laboratory techniques as machine work, glass blowing, 
and electronics. Laboratory 6 hours. 

iji, .i.?2 fUNIOR SEMINAR, INDEPENDENT STUDY, RESEARCH 

}4Ui ASTRONOMY 

Descriptive astronomy of the solar system, the galaxy, and the universe. Lecture 3 
hours. 

H2c, ELECTRONICS 

Theory and application of electronic devices. Lecture 3 hours. Prerequisite: Physics 
201, 202. 

401 CLASSICAL THEORETICAL MECHANICS 

The dynamics of particles, systems of particles and rigid bodies. Vector methods. Lec- 
ture 3 hours. Prerequisite: Physics 201, 202, Mathematics 301, 302. 

402 ELECTRICITY AND MAGNETISM 

Principles of magnetism, static and dynamic electricity. Vector methods. Lecture 3 
hours. Prerequisite: Physics 201, 202, Mathematics 301, 302. 

■illb THERMODYNAMICS 

Generalization of the ideas of work, heat, energy. Mathematics of thermodynamics. 
Lecture 3 hours. Prerequisite: Physics 201, 202. 

41 2h OPTICS 

Geometrical optics and lens aberrations, interference, diffraction, and polarization. 
Lecture 3 hours. Prerequisite: Physics 201, 202. 
22 Id ADVANCED LABORATORY 

A series of more advanced experiments chosen by each student with the consent of the 
instructor. Laboratory 6 hours. Prerequisite: Physics 321, 322. 
-/.'/, 4} 2 SENIOR SEMINAR, INDEPENDENT STUDY, RESEARCH 



College Calendar of Events 
1963-1964 



August 30 Orientation period; incoming freshmen should arrive on campus before noon 

September 1 Dormitories open to upperclassmen at noon 

September 2 Independent study examinations and re-examinations 

September 3 Fall Semester commences at 8:00 A.M. 

October 17 Meeting of Board of Trustees 

October 18-19 Visitation of parents; no classes 

November 28 Thanksgiving Day; no classes 

December 11 Fall Semester examination period commences at 8:00 A.M. 

December 18 Fall Semester ends and Christmas Recess commences at 4:30 P.M. 

December 19 Dormitories closed at noon 

January 1 Dormitories reopen at 8:00 A.M. 

January 2 Winter Term commences at 8:00 A.M. 

January 16 Meeting of the Board of Trustees 

January 31 Winter Term ends 

February 3 Spring Semester commences at 8:00 A.M. 

March 20 Sunshine Festival of States 

March 26 Spring Recess commences at 4:30 P.M.; dormitories closed 

March 27 Good Friday 

March 29 Easter 

April 5 Dormitories reopen at 8:00 A.M. 

April 6 Spring Recess ends and classes begin at 8:00 A.M. 

April 16 Meeting of the Board of Trustees 

May 23 Spring Semester examination period commences at 8:00 A.M. 

May 30 Spring Semester ends 

May 31 Baccalaureate 

June 1 Commencement 

June 2 Dormitories closed at noon